By - cb4il

THREE DAYS OF SPECIAL SESSION HAVE COST ILLINOIS TAXPAYERS $150,000 FOR LESS THAN AN HOUR OF WORK

Illinois Policy For these special sessions, each lawmaker gets paid a stipend of $111 per day. That doesn’t sound so bad until you count up all the Senate members (59), and all the House members (118), then multiply that by

By - cb4il

INSTEAD OF BUDGET, ILLINOIS LAWMAKERS VOTE ON TRIVIAL MATTERS

WSIL-TV Have you ever seen a kid waiting for his parents, forced to sit on a bench or at a table, just killing time until they get there (think pre-smartphone)? That’s what I feel like the general assembly is doing

By - cb4il

COMPTROLLER WARNS ILLINOIS FINANCES IN ‘MASSIVE CRISIS MODE’

State Journal-Register So, the Comptroller is akin to mom/dad sitting at the kitchen table paying the bills now? You know what they do when they’ve run up massive debts and can no longer make even the monthly minimums? They call

By - cb4il

ILLINOIS GOVERNOR DODGES SUIT OVER REPEATED BUDGET VETOES

Courthouse News Service 98 different social service organizations sued Gov. Rauner and others to demand payment for services they rendered, citing that the Governor is to blame for vetoing budget legislation. For once, I’m relieved by the court’s decision, who

By - cb4il

MENDOZA: BUDGET TRUMPS ALL OTHER ILLINOIS WOES

Dispatch Argus It’s great that Comptroller Mendoza is pushing for the GA and Governor to pass a budget. I wish she would promote that they pass a BALANCED budget, because she very carefully avoids using that oh-so-important qualifier. To pass

By - cb4il

JUDGE TO ILLINOIS COMPTROLLER: STATE MUST PAY MEDICAID PROVIDERS MORE

Crain’s Chicago Business At some point there simply won’t be enough money to cover court orders – and then what? How much does Illinois have to drown in debt before Democrats and Republicans will put their parties aside and do

By - cb4il

DO ILLINOIS’ “CORE PRIORITIES” FOR PAYMENT MATCH YOURS?

Chicago Sun-Times Nice explanation here on how the money received each month from taxation is divided among the many bills in the state. “What happens to the money they’re collecting,” as Hank asked, is not a very easy question to